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Unnatural Selection: Vocabulary

1. Antibody 5. Environment 9. Genetic Engineering 13. Immunity
2. Disease 6. Evolution 10. Geriatric 14. Quarantine 
3. DNA 7. Follicle 11. Immune System 15. Risk
4. Evolution 8. Gene 12. Inflammation 16. Virus

 

Unnatural Selection: Discussion questions

1. Viral diseases such as the flu and AIDS are also constantly mutating into new forms. What are the possible consequences of being vaccinated against a virus that has a high mutation rate?

2. What are some real examples of adaptation and mutation?

3. Bacterial diseases such as pneumonia and strep throat are mutating rapidly because of stress applied to them by antibiotics. The antibiotics kill the weaker strains of the diseases. What could be the possible consequences of widespread antibiotic use?
What can people do to slow down this effect?

4. See if you have the following genetically inherited characteristics:
a. Widow's peak (hair forms a point on the forehead)
b. Attached or detached earlobes
c. The ability to roll or curl the tongue
d. Which is the dominant thumb? (clasp hands with fingers interlaced, the dominant thumb is on top)
e. Straight pinky (hold little fingers next to each other and see if top joints are straight or if they point away from each other)

 

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Copyright 2006 Drs.Cavanaugh  Last modified: March 06, 2008